The Boy Scouts of America has always provided leadership opportunities and various skills to boys across the country. Now, girls have those same chances.

The committee of Troop 1329 reached a mutual decision to open the troop to girls last February, making them the Scouts BSA. Thus far, nine girls have joined, ranging from fifth-graders to freshmen in high school, and they expect to have 12 girls by this coming February.

“We’ve got two troops under one committee,” explained Casey Slick, Scoutmaster for Troop 1329. “Technically they are still two separate troops, but there’s some things that we do come together and work on.”

Slick said she expected them to always be two separate troops.

“But I see more things coming that will be worked on jointly,” he said. “When we have a council event, we’ll go to it together. We did do one campout where we had both troops there.”

As for why girls should be allowed to be a part of BSA, Slick emphasized the valuable leadership skills they could gain, which looks good on applications for colleges and jobs.

“We’ve got females all over the country stepping into leadership positions, whether it be CEOs or in the Senate,” Slick said. “This is bringing females up in that kind of atmosphere. They’re learning how to be leaders at an early stage.

“Honestly, I see more positivity as we go further and work more together, because when they get out into the real world, they’re not going to find a job that’s all boys or a job that’s all girls. They’re going to have to learn to work together in some way, shape, or form.”