In its continued effort to establish itself as the go-to jurisdiction for digital asset businesses, Wyoming, through its Department of Audit, Division of Banking, recently published a digital asset custody regime for its newly created, special purpose depository institutions (SPDIs). SPDIs are banking institutions authorized to take custody of digital assets. If they function as intended, SPDIs may prove to be a solution to, among other things, digital asset companies’ money transmitter licensing woes.

One major impediment to entering the U.S. market for digital asset companies is the requirement to obtain money transmitter licenses from individual states. Applying for these licenses state by state can be expensive and burdensome, and some states have created additional hurdles for digital asset companies. New York, for example, requires digital asset companies to obtain a “BitLicense,” which is notoriously difficult to obtain, to operate in the state. California may soon follow suit, imposing substantial licensing requirements under Assembly Bill 1489, which has been introduced in the legislature.

Wyoming is trying a different approach. In establishing SPDIs, Wyoming is helping blockchain companies avoid the costs of these burdensome licensing regimes while still protecting customers by taking advantage of a regulatory benefit enjoyed by banking institutions like SPDIs. Per the Bank Secrecy Act, banks are exempt, as a general matter, from needing money transmitter licenses.

Further, advocates argue that the SPDIs will provide a solution for startups seeking to operate in New York without a BitLicense. Federal law, through the Riegle-Neal Amendments Act, protects the parity of national banks and the state-chartered banks of other states. Accordingly, if a state exempts a national bank from a regulation, then other state-chartered banks must be exempt from that regulation as well. Because New York exempts national banks from the requirement to obtain a BitLicense to operate, so the argument goes, Wyoming’s SPDIs – which are state-chartered banks – should be exempted from that requirement as well. This theory remains untested, and New York has not taken a position on whether it will exempt SPDIs from needing a BitLicense to operate there. Perhaps Wyoming’s status as “The Equality State” will prompt New York to provide its state-chartered banks with “equal” treatment.