Angie Bolden was 19 and in nursing school when she befriended a 23-year-old dying of testicular cancer in the hospital. Family didn’t come by much, so she’d visit and play cards after school.

“He died screaming in pain, no family, everybody afraid to medicate him,” Bolden said. “I thought, ‘Boy, that is not going to happen on my watch.’”

She became a hospice nurse. Years later, so did her daughter, Shanna.

In her nursing home, Tammy Bean was the home health aide others would barter with to avoid their dying patient.

“People there were so uncomfortable with death and I wasn’t,” Bean said. “‘I’ll take three of your patients if you’ll take so-and-so down at the end of the hall,’ and I would graciously do it. That is my niche. I’ve tried other jobs, this is where I belong.”

She became a hospice nurse. Years later, so did her daughter, Nicole.