Three Democratic presidential candidates say they think the president is a white supremacist. The brother of one of those candidates tweeted a list of names of Trump donors in his hometown, saying they were “fueling hate.” The president’s son compared that congressman to the Dayton shooter. And that isn’t even the half of it.

The ugliness of our politics is on full display this week, when the nation least needs to see it.

This past weekend’s violence — mass shootings in El Paso and Dayton, Ohio — appears to have intensified the already volatile national political debate.

The violence has ramped up a “with us or against us” mentality, especially when it comes to the Democratic resistance to President Trump. (Woe is the prominent business owner who raises funds for Trump right now, or news outlet that writes, then corrects, a bad headline about Trump’s calls for unity.)

On the defensive about his contribution to the racial animus in the country, Trump and his team found a way to point the finger at Democrats while seeking praise for his response to the tragedy. Trump’s team claimed he was treated “like a Rock Star” by victims he visited Wednesday in Ohio (they did not let journalists in during the visit to verify this), after which Trump publicly seethed at Democratic Ohio politicians, accusing them of speaking badly of him when in fact they had praised his handling of the hospital visit.

Rep. Joaquin Castro (D-Tex.) — brother of Democratic presidential candidate Julián Castro — on Tuesday published the names of donors to Trump in his San Antonio district. Such information is publicly available, but rarely is it displayed so overtly by politicians. Joaquin Castro’s message: If you donate to Trump, you’re part of the problem that led to what happened in El Paso.  […]